Preview Mode Links will not work in preview mode

Welcome to the BAMM-IT Podcast!  Click the links here to

  • Follow us on Facebook
  • Email Us
  • Subscribe to the RSS feed
  • Subscribe to the Podcast on iTunes (Apple)
  • Subscribe to the Podcast on Google Play (android)

 

Apr 8, 2019

So you started your own business and went online to one of those do-it-yourself legal forms websites and got the LLC or your lawyer set one up for you.  You think your personal assets are protected from any corporate lawsuits, but are you really?  In this podcast we have Rob Mays of MayLawFirmNC.com as our guest to scare the bejesus out of us.  Rob is a special kind of a lawyer and you want him on your side.  If someone owes you money and they use their LLC as protection, he finds ways that the "corporate seal of protection" may have been broken or way too thin to begin with.  Listen and learn:

  • What are corporate protections and what should small businesses know about them?
  • What does not blowing it mean?
  • How to properly setup your corporation
  • Things you should not rely on
  • Common mistakes in mixing and mingling personal and business.

Who is Rob?

Before founding The Mays Law Firm in 2018, Rob Mays was a shareholder at the largest law firm headquartered in Asheville. Prior to returning to North Carolina in 2010, he practiced for five years in the Washington, D.C. office of an international law firm. He started his career as a law clerk for the Honorable Gerald B. Tjoflat, U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit. Mr. Mays has litigated a wide range of matters in federal and state courts. He has briefed cases for the U.S. Supreme Court and both state and federal appellate courts. Rob has served on the Bankruptcy Council of the North Carolina Bar Association. He was named to Business North Carolina’s “Legal Elite” for Bankruptcy in 2018, and named as a “Super Lawyer” for Creditor-Debtor Rights in 2019. Rob graduated with honors from Duke University School of Law, where he was Editor-In-Chief of Duke’s oldest law journal, and simultaneously earned a graduate degree in public policy.